Differentiating a snake’s sex

Some snake owners are sometimes curious about the sex of their snakes. Differentiating a snake’s sex is not as easy as it is in other animals. Outwardly, male and female snakes seem to be look alike. Notwithstanding, with a touch of understanding, there are approaches to tell which from which.

#1 Tail Characteristics

Male snakes have a couple of cylinder molded hemipenes (sex organs) that regularly sit within their bodies. They are essentially two little penises that are hidden carefully inside the snake’s tail. Female snakes don’t have them.

The hemipenes are found just underneath the cloacal (vent) opening and down along the tail on either side of the snake’s midline.

Since these sex organs are not just visible to the eyes on the male snake, they may not be evident to you at first. There are noticeable pieces of information that they are there, however. You have to properly examine the shape and length of the tail to help you obtain the information you require.

Male snakes usually have a tail (the part of the snake beginning after the cloacal opening) that is longer and thicker when compared to females. It additionally tapers in an unexpected way: beginning thick and then getting thinner at the tip. Female snakes have a general shorter and thinner tail and this evenly tapers at the tip

#2 Probing

Probing a snake requires embedding a thin metal rod otherwise known as a probe into the cloacal vent of the snake while it is conscious. This extraordinary probe can be embedded further in males since they have a hemipenis on both sides of the vent. The probe will drop further into one of these spaces that goes down further the tip of the tail.

In the females, the probe doesn’t go down very far. That is on the grounds that there is no space for it to go when you are coordinating the probe towards the tip of the tail. Females just have little scent gland spaces.

Picture two long socks inside the tail of a male snake that open up at the vent of the snake and you are essentially envisioning the hemipenes. The probe will slide down into one of those hemipenes effortlessly if the snake is a male.

  • If it is a female, the probe does not go further than 1-3 scales.
  • If it is a male, the probe can go down as further as 15 scales.

On the probe’s scale, the distinction between the sexes is very sensational. With bigger snakes, the probe is really dropped into to a greater extent a pocket.

Probing a snake should just be done in the event that you have somebody to keep your snake still, when you own an averagely sized probe and when you are certain you can do it correctly and carefully. If you are not familiar with this procedure, do not attempt it because you could harm your snake.

#3 Popping Hemipenes

To do this, pressure is solidly but tenderly with a finger on the snake underneath their vent where the hemipenis would turn out. If done appropriately, the hemipenis will effortlessly pop out.

This method could cause serious trauma to the snake if not done properly and furthermore, it is recommended to only be done on smaller snakes like the ball python.


Angora rabbits for wool production

The Angora rabbit was first sighted in Ankara, Turkey, or at least that is what we have come to believe. What is certain is that Europe has raised angora rabbits for their fiber for a considerable length of time and the French are known for making their wool; famous around 1790 – although it was up till 1920 before North America saw luxury fiber.

#1 Angora Rabbit Breeds

There are five Angora rabbit breeds that rule in fiber generation: German Angora Giant Angora, Satin Angora, French Angora and English Angora.

Different breeds, for example, the Jersey Wooly and the American Fuzzy Lop additionally create wool. In spite of the fact that hand-spinners are glad to spin with these fibers, these two breeds produce significantly less wool due to their small stature.

The wooled breeds are quiet natured and are known for their compliant demeanor. They make brilliant pets and are delicate with kids. All things considered, day to day care for this rabbit regularly falls onto the grown-up as the grooming can be tedious.

#2 About Angora Rabbit Wool

Angora rabbit wool is very popular and considered top notch in the fiber producing world. Angora fiber can be sold raw as it is gotten off the rabbit either left in their regular color, dyed or spun.

Its fiber so fine, that it is typically mixed with different fibers, for example, cashmere, silk, mohair and sheep‘s wool. The surface of Angora wool alone is viewed as too fine to even consider holding the thick lines of knitting.

Angora is considered to be multiple times hotter than sheep‘s wool and considered unreasonably warm for a piece of clothing. Mixing others with angora wool will add a ‘halo’ effect, warmth and softness to a piece of clothing.

#3 Harvesting Angora Wool

Wool can be harvested from the rabbit from means of either shearing or plucking. A few breeds, for example, the English Angora, normally shed (or otherwise regarded as “blowing their jacket”) a few times a year. In any case, natural molting varies from breed to breed.

Raisers that have naturally molting rabbits can exploit this by relentlessly culling the slackened fiber while they’re in a molt. In other cases, the wool harvesting can be done by means of clippers or scissors.

For the record, the process of harvesting should never harm or bring pain to the rabbit.

#4 Advantages of Raising Angora Rabbits

  • They’re a no-kill domesticated animal (as producers of wool), which is beneficial to rabbit farmers or prospective rabbit farmers.
  • Easy to feed.
  • Breeding is straightforward and reproduction is quick.
  • Harvesting the wool is unwinding and pleasurable.
  • Rabbits can likewise be entered in shows, move toward becoming 4H undertakings, and make incredible pets – making them a family venture.
  • Fiber can be sold for a benefit or kept close by for hand-spinning for the breeder.

#5 Angora Raising Considerations

  • Angora rabbits require extraordinary husbandry practices that are essential to their wellbeing and in addition fiber production.
  • Animal hypersensitivities in the family.
  • Coat upkeep.
  • Daily care as it is with other animals.